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MI Trail Rules and SnoScoot Question

Discussion in 'SnoScoot,SRX120' started by burlyviper, Nov 20, 2017.

  1. burlyviper

    burlyviper VIP Member VIP Member

    Messages:
    165
    Location:
    Ottawa Lake MI
    Country:
    USA
    Snowmobile:
    2018 Sidewinder LTX LE, blue
    2011 Apex 128, Ulmer Airbox and clutch kit, PCV, HID
    2008 Phazer RTX
    1980 Exciter 300
    When I read MI DNR rules, it says:

    A person who is at least 12 but less than 17 years of age must successfully complete a Michigan-approved snowmobile safety course if they will be:
    • operating a snowmobile without the direct supervision of a person 21 years of age or older. (certificate must be in operator's immediate possession.)
    • crossing any highway or street. (certificate must be in operator's immediate possession.)

    If your child is younger than 12 years old and can ride, how do you legally take him/her on the trails? If anything, the rule about crossing a street will come into play at most gas stops.
     
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  3. ManhattanMike

    ManhattanMike VIP Member VIP Member

    Messages:
    124
    Location:
    Manhattan, IL
    Country:
    USA
    Snowmobile:
    2006 Apex, 2018 Snoscoot
    I'm not an expert but I don't think you can legally take him/her on the trail until they are 12.
     
  4. rlbock

    rlbock Expert

    Messages:
    210
    Location:
    Saline, MI
    Under your direct supervision he can ride his own sled on the trails
     
    03RX1-ER-LE likes this.
  5. 03RX1-ER-LE

    03RX1-ER-LE Expert

    Messages:
    491
    Location:
    M-Th Livonia Mich F-S Oscoda Mich
    Country:
    USA
    Snowmobile:
    2009 Apex ER 2003 RX1 ER and 2003 RX1 ER LE
    LOCATION:
    Livonia Michigan
    My son took his snowmobile safety class and was able to ride his modified Mini-Z which did 24mph, then his Bravo which did 50mph, with us on the trails for years until he was 16, and then moved him up to his V-Max 500 XTC deluxe, then took over my 03 Viper until getting his RX1. Just wished he still rode with me, but life gets in the way when you have family's etc.
     
  6. Al Bundy

    Al Bundy Lifetime Member Lifetime VIP Member

    Messages:
    282
    Location:
    Maine
    Country:
    USA
    Snowmobile:
    2004 Rx Warrior
    The rule in Maine is similar. Rider must be 10+ to ride on trails but needs to be 14 to cross road. So when my 13 y/o son comes to a road he gets off the machine and I drive it across. He walks across the road, jumps on the sled and we head on our way.
     
  7. OVR4D

    OVR4D TY 4 Stroke Junkie

    Messages:
    712
    Location:
    MN
    In Minnesota, youth riders under 11 can operate a sled on trails provided they abide by certain rules (see below). Because they're not permitted to cross roads, I've always crossed first, then crossed back on foot and driven their sled accross with them onboard. In any event, here's what Minnesota says about youth operation:

    Youth Operation Requirements
    • The owner or person in lawful control of a snowmobile is jointly responsible for
    laws broken by a minor on that snowmobile.
    • Anyone under 18 years old must wear an approved helmet.

    Snowmobile Safety Certificate Minnesota Residents
    Any resident of Minnesota born after December 31, 1976, must have a snowmobile
    safety certificate to operate a snowmobile in Minnesota. Youth must be 11 years old
    to take a snowmobile safety course, the certificate is not valid until the 12th birthday.

    Residents and Non-Residents Under Age 12 (Without safety certificate)
    • May drive snowmobiles on public lands, public waters, or grant-in-aid
    trails if accompanied by an adult*
    • May not drive a snowmobile across state or county roads
    • May not drive snowmobiles on streets or highways in a municipality

    Ages 12 & 13
    • May drive snowmobiles on public lands, public waters, or grant-in-
    aid trails IF Accompanied by an adult* OR In possession of a valid
    snowmobile safety certificate
    • May not drive a snowmobile across state or county roads
    • May not drive snowmobiles on streets or highways in a municipality

    Ages 14 to 18
    • May drive a snowmobile across state or county roads IF in possession
    of a snowmobile safety certificate or driver’s license or ID card with
    valid snowmobile indicator
    • May drive snowmobiles on public lands, public waters, or grant-in-aid
    trailsWITH a snowmobile safety certificate
    • May drive snowmobiles on streets or highways in municipalities, if not
    contrary to ordinance Over Age 18
    • Residents born after December 31, 1976, who operate a snowmobile
    in Minnesota must possess a valid snowmobile safety certificate or a
    driver’s license or ID card with a valid snowmobile indicator.
    * Accompanied by an adult means a parent, legal guardian, or other person 18 years of age or older designated by the
    parent or guardian who needs to be close enough to be able to direct the youth’s operation of their snowmobile.

    Exception for Residents and Non-Residents Without a snowmobile safety certificate, a person under the age of
    14 years may operate a snowmobile only if they are supervised or accompanied by one of the
    following: parent, legal guardian, or other person 18 years of age or older designated
    by the parent or guardian. The supervising or accompanying adult needs to be close
    enough to be able to direct the youth’s operation of their snowmobile. This exception
    does not allow an operator under the age of 14 to cross a public road.

    Non-residents who are 18 years old and older do not need a snowmobile safety certificate.
     

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